Open notes in a Resident clinic: research study results

19498357-10-4-cover

Research study paper is here:    http://ow.ly/6eY530jYZJy

We’re published! Thanks to co-authors Bradley Crotty MD, Corey Lyons MD, and Matthew Moles MD, we helped a multi-health system collaborative to study the idea of Open Notes in primary care residencies (family medicine and internal medicine at University of Colorado Health system), with research findings above.

Ultimately there is some anxiety from both faculty and residents about patients reading their written progress notes online, after the physicians have signed off on those visit notes. We are happy to claim that our program, of all the training programs was least optimistic that this would turn out well for our physicians and patients.

Overall, though, since we gathered this survey data, we have gone on to turn on Open Notes throughout our health system (UCHealth) and now uniformly offer Open Notes to all patients in our 700 clinics, 11 hospitals, and 21 emergency departments. The fear that the “world would come to an end” has not yet come to pass, and we are hearing positive things from our patients about their ability to read notes and benefit from them, including:

  • I often forget much of what we discussed in the visit, now I can go back and refresh my memory
  • Sometimes my wife asks me “what did the doctor say?” and now we can go review it together
  • Sometimes my other doctors don’t receive the consultation letter from my specialist, and now I can show him/her that letter/note from my patient portal. I can be in charge of my own information
  • I can use my doctors note to look up words I don’t understand and get more background information so that I can ask more intelligent questions at my next visit; I feel like a part of my own healthcare team

CMIO’s take: it is good to study what we do. As Robert Anderson MD, one of my mentors told me: “We should use the laboratory of our direct patient care to study and learn. Everything we do with patients should be evaluated and can be improved.” Thanks, Bob!

I wanted Vicodin, not Herbal Tea (nytimes)

We are in the midst of a national opioid crisis. It is a crisis, partially, of our own making. In the past decade we physicians were criticized for not adequately addressing the pain of our patients, to the point of creating another vital sign: “pain score.” And then dutifully tracking this score and catering to it, and addressing pain, often with rehab therapy, with more aggressive interventions, injections, surgeries, and, yes, sometimes with pain meds, including narcotics and anxiolytics.

And on top of this, we layered “patient satisfaction” as a rubric, and now a method of affecting physician reimbursement. What could go wrong? Isn’t satisfying our patients a core precept of our identity as physicians?

Actually, come to think of it… no.

We are here to help our patients get better.

To cure sometimes, to relieve often, and to comfort always.
–15th century folk saying

But there’s nothing in that saying that says “and always write for a narcotic script if you’re in danger of getting a low satisfaction score.

So, here we are, with an opiate crisis, and faced with the very difficult task of reducing or eliminating opiate use in patients whom we have PUT on chronic opiates. So, this NYtimes article is timely and fascinating.

In fact, we are in the midst of designing and implementing an ERAS program (Enhanced Recovery After Surgery) in our health system, to entirely eliminate the use of opiates before, during and after surgery. Apparently pioneered by surgeons at Duke University, we are well on the way to experiencing similar benefits for our patients, faster recovery, reduce hospital stays, higher patient satisfaction.

This is reminiscent of Atul Gawande’s book “Better” where he describes the idea that “If even elite athletes have coaches to improve their game, maybe surgeons should have coaches.” And then finding that having a former mentor observe him during surgery, he received pages of notes on how to improve his operating technique and outcomes. Hmm. We should do more of this, inspecting our usual practices, and working out how to continuously improve.

CMIO’s take? There is always something new to learn.

Happy holidays from the Large PIGs, JIG, and CMIO

Dave Corry arriving late to our group photo, to the CMIO’s amusement and dismay

I hope that you are making plans to celebrate the season, to connect with friends, colleagues, family, and take time for yourself.

I consider myself so fortunate to work with such a great group of informaticists or informaticians (inforMAGICIANs?!), or informatics people, whatever we call ourselves. The work we do, sometimes seems like a grind, but keep in mind, fellow informagicians, that we strive to improve the lives of patients, colleagues and staff by improving the information systems we use for the greater good. 

We try to keep it light in our naming of projects and committees. For example, our Joint Informatics Group (including clinical informatics nurses as well as physician informatics) is JIG. Our physician informatics group are the PIGs. This leads to the New PIG book club, the Small PIG leadership group, and the meeting, which encompasses all physician informaticists: Large PIG. 

And, be sure to throw up your hands and have a good laugh once in awhile. By the way, here’s an updated picture with Dave raising a glass. 

CMIO’s take? Here’s to you and the good work we all do. Cheers!

Where does creativity come from?*

“Where does creativity come from? We don’t know but we are certain that it doesn’t come from our laptops” –John Cleese

Thank you, Sir Cleese. I have enjoyed your movies, your quips, your oeuvre, and even the way you say “oeuvre.” And now, you give talks on creativity.

In my readings, I must agree, working on computers, on laptops is simple, is portable, allows us to store our thoughts in the CLOUD to avoid getting our papers lost in some stack. And yet, the non-verbal result of our tapping away at our computers, our laptops, our tablets, our phones, is an implied communication that we are in our own bubble.

Furthermore, using keyboards seems to reduce the ability for our brains to engage in encoding incoming information, with research showing that students learn better when they take notes ON PAPER as opposed to using an electronic device, maybe because SLOW handwriting forces a brain to choose the important words rather than take down words verbatim, and maybe because having an open laptop (often open to SOME other interesting website) distracts us AND OTHERS SITTING BEHIND US to losing focus and not really listening.

Finally, numerous books on creativity talk about how computers may be terrific at creating beautiful documents and flyers, but are generally terrible at restricting the free flow of ideas that is only possible with pencil, colored markers, sticky notes, lots of paper and scissors. Some advocate for having TWO desks in your office: one for creative work that has NO electronics, only paper manipulatives, and one for the computer, when the creative work is done, to put the completed work into a pretty format for printing or electronic storage and transmission.

I’ve taken to this model and try to do creative work away from my computer now. I also take notes in a small black book, not on my phone, and I’ve found this (although not searchable) a great way to better encode and remember discussions.

CMIO’s take? Keep in mind where creativity comes from
and where it doesn’t come from.

Book review: Artemis

41rdzw8wchl

Five stars.

Maybe the best sci-fi book of the year? Well, it is in the running. I’m sure it is difficult for an author to follow-up a first-novel blockbuster book with a successful second novel, but Andy has pulled it off. It is NOT the paradigm-shifting story of a marooned human on Mars, but a gritty, near-future story about a super-smart deliveryman (gal) who is sick of people telling her she’s “not living up to her potential.” And she is a smuggler: she smuggles goods in from Earth to the Moon colony called Artemis. But then her smuggling gets her involved in something a lot bigger than she intended.

Andy unwinds this tale with a huge dollop of delicious hard-science fully integrated into the storytelling and into the problem-solving. This key is the same key that unlocked The Martian for me and so many others. Feels like the 1970’s TV show “The A-team” except with hard science instead of those rapid-action cut scenes where they’re building something cool that will get them out of trouble by the end of the episode. That kind of feeling. Except better.

CMIO’s take? Science rocks. Artemis rocks. Two thumbs up.

The Glass Cage by Nicholas Carr (book review)

The Glass Cage pbk mech.indd

One of our book club books, for the ‘clinical decision support’ team for the electronic health record at our institution. We have now read it in our Large PIG book club meeting (the Physician Informatics Group: we try hard not to take ourselves too seriously). Some of us were depressed after reading. The initial optimism of the ‘glass cockpit’, the fancy new computerized design of the complex Airbus aircraft, are instead proving to be a ‘glass cage’, which isolates us and anesthetizes us from the real world. The author provides riveting examples of glass cages: the Inuit who lose their cultural skills of navigating brutally inhospitable landscapes because of GPS and snowmobiles, also, the pilots who make error because of automation, leading to automation bias and automation complacency: thinking the computer must be right, and the computer will know, so I don’t have to. Further, our attention wanders as we cede responsibility for moment to moment control of the task. How do we fight such a trend and temptation, as designers?

Yet the author speaks about ‘adaptive automation’ where a computer could detect the cognitive load or stress in a human partner, and share the cognitive work appropriately. He speaks of Charles Lindbergh, describing his plane as an extension of himself, as a ‘we.’ Can we aspire to improving the design of our current electronic systems to such a partnership that avoids the anesthetic effect and instead becomes more than the sum of the partners? Chess is now played best by human-computer partners; could health care and other industries be the same? And what could that look like? The Glass Cage gives us an evidence-based view into that future (and hopeful) world.

UPDATE: We had a great discussion during our recent book club. As an indicator, several of my colleagues told me: “I don’t like this book.” Perfect! It made for a juicy, spirited conversation about the benefits and risks of automation and how the stories in the book did or did not apply to healthcare and what we were building. Maybe we can consider “adaptive automation” so that the computer scales up and down its assistance as the clinician comes under crisis so that the human can focus on problem solving and the computer can increasingly assist with routine tasks. And then, we need to take care that “automation complacency” does not increase. We already have heard of clinicians saying “Well, EHR did not pop up an alert for a drug interaction, so that means it must be safe to prescribe this new med for this patient.” Whoa, are we giving away the primacy of our own training and experience to an algorithm already?

CMIO’s take: keep reading, keep learning. It is only through extensive experience from reading and books that we can learn from others in healthcare, and from others in other industries divergent from our own. There are more smart people who DON’T work for you, than who do.

 

Augmented Reality: the Homecourt app on iPhone XS: wow!

nash01

https://www.si.com/tech-media/2018/09/12/steve-nash-homecourt-app-apple-event-iphone-xs-camera-watch-shot-tracker

More whiz-bang tech. The latest iPhone now supports more augmented reality, by allowing the app access to a video stream of someone practicing shooting hoops and giving feedback in REAL TIME as to the spots from which shots are attempted and made. In other words, AI now auto-processes video that used to take hours of video TAPE pored over by coaches and players, and simplifies this into a device we already carry. (OK, those of us with >$1000 disposable income and a desire for the latest and greatest geek toy).

But, think, if we applied this to healthcare, would we use this to:

  • Monitor patient meals by automatically calculating what is being consumed?
  • Watch how patients are flowing through clinic to learn how to optimize efficiency?
  • See how ER patients are doing in the waiting area and triage and in the treatment areas?
  • Watch for improved efficiency in procedural areas like endoscopies, bronchoscopies, cath labs?
  • Watch how minor procedures are performed and suggest tweaks to clinician performance without the shame of having a human supervisor around?

CMIO’s take? Interesting to see how and where Augmented Reality might show up in healthcare, based on bleeding edge ideas in other fields like sports.