My newest ukulele EHR parody song: Inbasket Dynamite

Has anyone ever written a K-pop anthem into an EHR parody? Is it possible to set an hyperobject to music? Regrettably, someone has tried.

CT’s at it again: doesn’t he ever learn?

It is great to be back together among our tribe of informaticists at Epic’s XGM (eXpert Group Meeting) in Verona, Wisconsin, where the best and the brightest share our work, our leadership and change management lessons, and celebrate our successes.

Inbasket Dynamite refers to the Hyperobject that is the EHR inbasket, the nerve center of communications that, like the post office, can grow to unmanageable size and could contribute to physician and provider burnout. Time to “light it up” and redesign it.

I’m on stage at the Epic Physician Advisory Council (PAC) reception, grateful to receive the 2021 PACademy Award (physician of the year) from the voting of our international physician informatics community, along with Heidi Twedt (2020 awardee) and Joel Buchanan (2022 awardee). Due to the pandemic, we have missed the last 2 years of the PAC meeting in person, so this is our catch-up. I’m honored to be in such company.

If you’re not a BTS fanatic, like we are at our house, here are a couple of videos to whet your appetite:

My son Avery covering BTS’s dance moves in Dynamite, for the pure joy of it:

And, one of the official BTS music videos on Dynamite. Many of their videos have been viewed over a billion times (ahem, a Billion):

“Epic Man” ukulele audio recording from a recent Becker’s Podcast featuring — me

3 minutes to change your life. Cheer? Boo? Choose your own adventure if you listen in.

Hope you enjoy this. I think this is the “least bad” version of my ukulele parody song “Epic man” (with apologies to Elton John and Rocket Man). Audio only.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/picuhxmbeagdws0/2022-EpicManAudio3min.mov?dl=0

Sepsis, Machine Learning and the Centaur (my SMILE conference talk)

Find out: What is a centaur and what does it have to do with healthcare? What are the criteria for a good machine learning project? What is the role of a virtual health center with predictive models? And most importantly: What ukulele song goes with machine learning?

Here are the slides for my talk given at SMILE (Symposium for Machine learning, ImpLementation and Evaluation). The slides are mostly self-explanatory. You can also watch my talk at YouTube. Here is a PDF of the entire deck.

I can see clearly now, my Sprain is gone (ukulele)

Thanks to my collaborators on the Patient Radiology Image Viewing team at UCHealth: Evan Norris MD, Ciarra Halaska, Justin Honce MD, Peter Sachs MD, and Kate Sanfilippo. Come see our talk at Epic XGM 2021 (eXpert Group Meeting) next month! Session Rad 1.4

What’s the TL;DR? Allowing patients to view their radiology images in their patient portal, alongside their radiology reports, is technically feasible, and does NOT cause increased anxiety for patients or increased workload for providers (in fact, ZERO phone calls, and yet our patients view 39,000 images per month!). Eighty percent of patients liked it. Many showed their images to their providers, some saved copies, some posted on social media! Some had technical difficulties, some had trouble understanding the images.

It is a good start, but there is more work to be done!

Wanna know more? Here is our pre-print publication.

CMIO’s take? It is wonderful to work on teams with great colleagues in the service of better, more transparent patient care.

I am NOT Throwin’ Away My Shot – Covid Vaccine (ukulele)

I wondered what Lin-Manuel meant when he wrote this song. Turns out, it was for THIS moment.

While my colleagues are working hard delivering vaccine doses to healthcare workers as fast as we can (15,000 doses given in the last 5 days! Woo!), I’m hard at work at the Ukulele Parody Studios.

Here it is: the world premiere of a song that seems titled for this moment in time: I am not throwin’ away MY SHOT.

Thanks to Lin-Manuel Miranda for the original, and the overall miracle of the Hamilton musical. No thanks to him, on how hard this song is to sing.

Happy holidays, y’all.

Telehealth World: CT finds ukulele song partners!

Telehealth Ukulele Song!

Thanks to George Reynolds, CMIO and CIO extraordinaire, who put together a dream team of CMIO leaders to facilitate a course for up-and-coming leaders in the area of informatics. This year, CHIME (the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives) opened up the future-CMIO candidates for this course, to nurse, pharmacist, and other clinical informatics candidates. Our 30 participants this year made this 6-week, 2-hours-live-with-weekly-homework a blast to teach and discuss. That course concluded this week. Here’s how to sign up for future courses through CHIME:

https://ignitedigital.org/clinical-informatics-leadership-boot-camp-digital

We tackled: governance, high performance teams, creating value, leading change, and other topics.

And of course, what would an informatics session be, without some ukulele. Thank you to Amy Sitapati from UCSD, Brian Patty, former CMIO at Rush, and George Reynolds, former CMIO and CIO, and now with CHIME, singing with me.

CMIO’s take? Make music! Make art! You can clearly see, we are not gonna win any awards with our skills, but we sure had a great time putting this together. I am grateful for colleagues willing to stick their necks out to sing with me.

Ortho Virtual Care. Ukulele song about video visits (parody of Wonderful World)

Nope, did not use the word “pandemic” or “Covid”.

Searching Youtube for “Covid songs” gets you this: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=covid+song

Which is an entirely unreasonably long list; there are some great selections there. I’ll leave you to browse.

During pandemic, I’ve been learning clawhammer style, from this guy:

Makes my uke sound more like a banjo. Weird, and cool.

Meantime: Our clinics are getting back to business; our patients are returning to in-person care, our visit volumes are back up, past the 80% mark. I hope you are all staying safe; we’re not out of this yet, but it is starting to feel less like a sprint and more like a marathon. Take care of yourself, get some exercise, bring back a hobby or two.

“Empty Wallet” or Real Time Benefits Check interfaced into the EHR (woo!) Ukulele

Yet another misadventure with our protagonist

Thanks to all our EHR colleagues; I’m returning from Epic’s UGM (User Group Meeting: check out the twitter-verse at #UGM19) and learned a ton from other customer presentations and from Epic’s future vision as a company. Here is our contribution: a successful integration of RTBC (real time benefits check) of prescription co-pay, prior authorization data, and “payer suggested alternative” meds, right in the prescriber’s workflow, right inside the EHR. Simple, works fast (pharmacy- and patient’s insurance-specific real-time check within about 1 second) for every prescription written. Now, you can tell the patient “This prescription has a $4 co-pay at Target pharmacy”. What a difference.

This was the difference between my patient NOT paying $291 for doxycycline tablets vs $90 for doxycyline capsules. Really?

See my blog post on RxRevu previously. This is working well, and we’ve scaled up to all 3000 prescribers at UCHealth with excellent results.

TO celebrate, we’ve come to discuss our success at UGM … and (of course) to sing a song. Thanks to Terri Couts, VP of Epic Applications at Guthrie Clinic, co-presenting the topic, and for agreeing to sing with me!

CMIO’s take? Enjoy the song.

InformatiMusicology is a thing (thanks, Ross!)

https://www.acmimimi.org/2018/10/InformatimukulelogicalOfferingsfromCTLin.html 

Ross Martin is a physician informatician extraordinaire. Among his many talents, he is a singer-songwriter with his own musical show, and he publishes a blog at at ACMIMIMI: the American College of Medical InformatiMusicology. Turns out there is a small community of physician informaticians who cross the line between work-a-day informatics and the arcane arts of … music?

For example, a fellow Fellow of ACMIMIMI is Dr. Francis Collins, founding member of the Human Genome Project, and Director of the National Institutes of Health. August company.

CMIO’s take? I’m sure all you health IT geeks out there have hidden talents. Let me know what they are!

I Can See Clearly That My Sprain is Gone – Ukulele parody (and an XGM talk)

Author along with co-conspirator Peter Sachs MD. Neither can sing.

We (Dr. Peter Sachs, Vice Chair of Radiology at UCHealth, and I) recently had the pleasure of presenting our recent quality improvement work at Epic’s XGM (eXpert’s Group Meeting) in Verona, WI this week. In brief, we created and turned on the ability for patients to view their own radiology IMAGES online in their patient portal. We had already been sharing radiology REPORTS with our patients for over a decade, and this is an additional step towards information transparency. We think we are among the first to do this.

Despite some minor misgivings on the part of our clinical leaders, we were given the green light to turn this on. Short answer, over 22,000 patients viewed their images in the first month, September 2018 and … no complaints from either doctors or patients! So, we get to keep our jobs!

If you have 2 minutes, here’s the song:

And, if you have another 25 minutes, here’s the talk, and some Q/A after:

Patients Viewing Their Radiology Images Online. Peter Sachs, CT Lin, XGM 2019

CMIO’s take? It is terrific to have a close community of like-minded physician informaticists and technologists pulling to improve healthcare and patient experience, and celebrating each other’s successes. I’m ever grateful to innovative and inspiring colleagues.

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