Grand Canyon: optimism, knees and fatherhood

In November of 2020, my son and I set out on a cross-country adventure to check on my parents in Los Angeles. Here are some life lessons (for me).

The CANYON

In November of 2020, my son and I set out on a cross-country adventure. We stopped and hiked the Grand Canyon, on our 2000-mile round trip.

The Buick

By Arthur Hu (Wiarthurhu at en.wikipedia) – Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by Kobac using CommonsHelper on Labs., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18438206

About 30 years ago, my parents drove me out in our Buick Station Wagon with faux wood paneling to attend medical school in California. On the way, we stopped by the Grand Canyon, goggled at the enormity of seeing a canyon 17 miles wide. On that day, with the smog, the North Rim looked more like a dingy painting rather than an impressive canyon. We read about adventurous souls who would hike down into the canyon either by mule or on foot, but it would never be us.

I have always dreamed about coming back and doing that hike, down to the river, and back. 

The Road Trip

Fast forward to 2020. My 18-year old son agrees on a 2-week road trip with Dad during his pandemic-infested gap year, so off we go. Finding my parents healthy, we spent a few days together in Los Angeles, and then headed back homeward.

On our return leg, we stay at the Grand Canyon Lodge. We take out our maps of trails to plan the next day. I reveal to him my long-forgotten, yet deep-seated hope of the massive Rim to River to Rim hike in one day. “Hey, it’ll be fun! What an adventure!”

The Lecture

To my amazement, my son starts lecturing me about knowing my limits.

Son: “Dad, you know this is 10,000 feet of elevation and 17 miles IN ONE DAY.”

Dad: “Yeah, I know. I can do it.”

“No, Dad, you haven’t trained for this. This is like climbing a 14-er. Remember how hard that was for you? Also like the ski-up to the 10th Mountain Hut trip. Remember how you said you would NEVER do that again? This is like that.”

“Oh. Right.”

“Wow, I sound a lot like Mom.”

“Yup, your mom always says that Dad has too much unwarranted optimism for his own good.”

“Um-hmm.”

“Well, it has been a dream of mine to hike down to the Colorado River at the bottom of the Canyon someday, and I think tomorrow is my chance to do it.”

“Sigh. Ok, sounds like your heart is set on it. We will have to make sure we give ourselves enough time. The ascent will be the hardest. Lets see…”

And so, my son the planner, set it all up. 

The Plan

  1. We get up at 4 am
  2. We arrive at the shuttle bus stop by 5 am (first bus), since no one is permitted to park AT the South Kaibab trailhead.
  3. We set off with flashlights on the trail at 5:15am. We allocate 4 hours for the descent, 7.7 miles, 5000 feet from 7500 to 2500. 
  4. We plan on 30 minutes for a meal at the river
  5. And then upwards, estimating 1 mile per hour for old Dad. Nearly 8 miles, nearly 8 hours. 
  6. We hope to reach the Rim again before dusk at 5pm. 

Whoa

Our first surprise: switchbacks. My son is in the lead, and he suddenly shouts “WHOA.”

Turns out our flashlights only see about 6 feet in front, and the switchback came up quickly, and his next step would have been…(shines flashlight), into the abyss. On our return trip, we look down, about 300 feet to the first rock outcroppings.

Whew.

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A bit chagrined, we continue. About 20 minutes later, we pause. Look up at the stars. The Milky Way about as bright as we’ve ever seen it. No sound. No birds. No wind. No hum. When it is THAT quiet, your ears sometimes make up a faint ringing just to fill the silence…

A minute later another traveler, jogging along. 

Son: “Hi there! How far you going?”

Traveler: “Rim to Rim to Rim. Have a good one!”

Wow. There is always someone crazier. 

The Glow

About an hour later, an orange glow on the horizon. Second hour, the crests of the North Rim start to glow bright orange. 

We take a water break, a potty break, small snack, then back on the trail. Fortunately, very cool still, 50 degrees, no wind, sunrise is spectacular in phases. I forgot my hiking poles! D’oh! but my knees were still doing remarkably well. 

The Mule Train

Third hour, sun is definitely up, and we get passed by the mule train.

Remarkable how fast those guys go. Clip-clop, doesn’t seem fast, but they keep really constant speed over everything. They pack in water and supplies for Phantom Ranch, and pack trash back out. Very cool. We must stay there someday. 

The River

8:30 am: We see the bottom of the canyon! and arrive at the Colorado River, bright green. 

The 3 Layers

There have been three layers of canyon: the very big painterly one, the middle sub-canyon that appears 2 hours into the hike, and then the final mysterious crevasses where the actual river runs now. The way it unfolded was brilliant and super-cool. In other words, I have no adequate words for it. 

Arriving at 8:30 is heartening. We are ahead of schedule. I did scrape my knee after the second switchback up top, and turns out, I have 4 sizable gouges in my knee, but the adrenaline blocked all the pain. Some blood seeped through my thick pants. My red badge of courage. Lunch of 2 bagel sandwiches, water. I always soak my feet in rivers or oceans when available (habits of a Florida boy), so 5 minutes in 35 degree water is about all I can take, but wow it is awesome after 7.7 miles. Brush off the sand, socks, boots back on. We are back on the upward trail at 9 am. 

The Upward Path?

Son: “OK Dad, I’m expecting us to go 1 mile an hour including stops, so we should be up by 5 pm, just before sunset. Let’s get going.

Dad: “I can do it. I feel pretty good.”

“Yeah, but it’s UPHILL now.” 

A couple more mule trains pass us going up. Some horseback riders from Phantom Ranch. Not many people on the trail really. We were up before most, so we only see 3-4 hikers in the first 3 miles, then only 10 going the other way in the rest of the hike (Ranch lodgers or Angel campgrounders). We flip the masks on for every one who passes. The ascent is hard on the old knees, but manageable. We allocate 30-minute scheduled breaks for water and trail mix, seems like a good schedule. Met some mules: they have names! (Betsy, Parker, Ralph). 

Finally, the sun hits part of the South Rim trail (otherwise in shadow all this time). And from pretty-cool, it becomes BAKING HOT. How does that happen so fast? I’m suddenly grateful for November, and a non-busy trail. Now we are looking for shady spots to rest and hydrate.

The False Summit

It is amazing to emerge from lower canyon to mid, and mid to upper. The false-summit problem comes up repeatedly. The top looks so close! but SERIOUSLY? THIS is not the summit, and there is another couple thousand feet! Too bad I did not note the starting altitude on my watch. 😦

My son notices that my pace is flagging as we ascend, and asks me in the later miles: 

“Want to rest here?”

“No. If I stop, I will lie down and cry, and I won’t ever get up again.”

“Ok”

The Non-verbal communication

The last 2 miles, we see kids and families hiking tentatively down, we see the dropoffs and switchbacks we did not see before. We see the massive vistas that we did not see before. The son starts getting annoyed with Dad taking SOOOOOO MANY PHOTOS.

Reviewing photos, now we can see him being fed up. Funny I didn’t see it when taking his photo. So much for my ability to spot nonverbal communication (one of my supposed specialties). 

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We arrive at the top, giddy as schoolkids. Dad Survives. We shuttle back to the car. It is only 2:30 pm at the top. Take that, pessimistic son! 

Son: “Proud of you Dad. Good job. That was amazing. Whoo!”

Dad: “I need a BIG PIZZA and then shower and bed. These rubber legs are DONE.”

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CMIO’s take? Don’t forget the hiking poles. And, sometimes sons (and canyons) have hidden depths.

SNAFU tent: Optimizing a Covid-19 Mass Vaccine effort at Many Levels

Dancin’ away troubles at UCHealth’s SNAFU tent for Covid Mass Vaccination

Optimizing the Mass Vaccine Event

This will be a fun exploration from a CMIO’s perspective. Let’s think about individuals and work our way up to national optimization, from a personal perspective. And, don’t miss the SNAFU Tent Vaccine Dance at the end…

Seven Levels of thinking

  • Level 1: Make myself efficient
  • Level 2: Make my pit-crew efficient
  • Level 3: Make all pit-crews efficient
  • Level 4: Make the entire Mass Vaccine efficient
  • Level 5: Optimize Mass Vaccine for volume or cost
  • Level 6: Optimize Health System Vaccination plan
  • Level 7: Optimize National Vaccination

1. Make myself efficient

Readers may remember recent writeups where I incrementally overcome my lack of skill as a physician at vaccinating. I’m a quick study, and when great nurses and medical assistants are around to teach, I got better quickly. See above, with the pre-peeled bandaid/ vaccine/ alcohol swab grip, and second hand to manage the smartphone electronic documentation. I’m MOB-ILE.

Here’s the set up: have an assistant play “keep ahead” by peeling bandaids. The hardest part of the job is peeling bandaids with gloves on.

The next hard part is that vinyl gloves stiffen in cold weather. So, use the sani-wipe jug to elevate your glove box closer to the propane heater. Smart! Actually even that wasn’t really warm enough, so I took to doing this:

I call this “praying to the propane gods.” Or, holding the gloves up for 5 seconds of warmth: makes a huge difference in the ease of putting them on (150 times that day).

Handwarmers: Even better idea

Of course, Bernice comes to me near the end of the day and tells me “Dr. Lin, put 2 handwarmers in your coat pockets and put your next pair of gloves in them, so you always have warm gloves to swap.

“D’oh!” as Homer Simpson would say. Why didn’t I think of that?! Thanks, Bernice.

Colorado Rockies’ Dinger drops by

2: Make my pit-crew efficient

This section is actually mis-labelled. My pit crew made ME efficient. Unlike previous days, where I built up such an efficient process that I was able to stay ahead of my pit-crew colleagues in our 4-car pit-stop, today I was teamed up with 3 outstanding medical assistants from Lowry Internal Medicine, my own UCHealth clinic in Denver: Marina, Yanira and Bernice. The tables were turned: now, every time I looked up from my completed vaccination, the other cars in my pit had already gone! Too fast, gals! You’re too fast for me. 😦

Team Lowry, with my BFF’s.

View of the Mega tent with 4 of the 8 rows, and the pharmacy (vaccine reconstitution tent to the right). The other 4 rows are out of sight to the right of the pharmacy tent. We can vaccinate 32 cars in 8 rows at a time this way. Furthermore, we would huddle and learn from each other “How are you going so fast? What is your set up? How do you ask the screening questions? Where do you put the sharps container?” etc. Thank you, smart colleagues, for teaching me.

3: Make all pit-crews efficient

To further smooth the process, given what we had learned on previous weeks, we posted 4 SNAFU tents after the Mega-tent that we would refer to for any slow-downs or technical concerns. For example, one car pulled up with 3 people to be vaccinated. I would perform one vaccination, and since my row was ready to roll by then, I would place a red card on the windshield, indicating SNAFU and the flaggers would direct the car to receive the remaining 2 shots about 100 yards away. This simple workflow adjustment (4 SNAFU tents for all 8 pit-crews) kept ALL 8 lines moving. This was a difference (for me) between vaccinating 124 people one day and 158 the next. Super smooth.

Another example: a patient drove up and their Electronic Record account showed “second vaccine already administered.” I couldn’t solve it with my smartphone Rover app, so I referred him to the SNAFU tent.

After some investigation, we found out later that day, it turns out that another organization in town had incorrectly registered that patient (a common first and last name and somehow erroneously documented date of birth) so that the mistaken vaccine APPEARED in OUR system on this patient (our separate Epic EHR’s share vaccine records now) that he had already had his second shot (incorrectly). We presume this was because some institutions are still using a paper-vaccination process with “document later” staff (as we did last month, in favor of speedy vaccinations). This re-introduces errors that the EHR was supposed to eliminate (bad handwriting and transcription errors). Hmm.

We are glad we are now using the Rover smartphone app. We’ve tinkered with it so that it is now possible to be as fast with Rover as with paper (AND eliminating the transcription step). 50 seconds with paper, and 50 seconds with Rover. Ha!

4: Make the entire Mass Vaccine efficient

We had lots of competing concerns to keep in mind, when thinking about the entire effort. Police were concerned about backing up waiting cars into nearby streets. (whew, we avoided this). How many total staff were needed to register patients? (too many in version 1) How many tents to rent for these events? (originally 1 mega and 18 cabana-style tents, now 1 mega and 2 cabanas) How would we deal with inclement weather? (snow, rain, black ice, wind: the mega-tent is superior to cabanas for keeping staff out of the weather and minimizing wifi and cell-booster mesh network issues; FYI, my new 5G iPhone 12 pro max was awesome in our pilot testing for speedy smartphone documentation)

Our diligent road crew out there dodging and managing tent-avalanches.

We have been pleased to constantly drive down out patient-throughput times, down to 22 minutes (including the 15 minute observation period)! And this past week on Sunday, we drove our total time down to 16 minutes in some cases: 1.5 minutes for registration, vaccination, a couple minute driving time, and then a 10-minute observation period. Wow. We believe we are the fastest Mass Vaccine service in the country at this rate. Even better, we are making observation OPTIONAL going forward, because of our non-existent severe reaction rate.

We believe we can expand beyond 10,000 per weekend, and believe we can do 20,000 or possibly 26,000 per weekend, if the State has vaccine supply and would like us to.

5: Optimize Mass Vaccine for volume or cost

So, what is the goal of a Mass Vaccine event? Publicity for vaccination? Sure, we had news helicopters circling, lots of press, lots of people commenting on how easy it was, and how much they’re looking forward to hugging grandkids.

We can optimize for convenience for frail elderly. Sure, stay in your car from home, back to home, no walking. Can we help people avoid healthcare settings? Sure.

We can optimize for speed: in which case, bring more vaccinators, and rent a second mega-tent. There is room in this massive parking lot for more staff, we can create more lanes and instead of 32 at a time, we could do 48 cars or more. 20,000 per weekend is entirely conceivable, if vaccine supply were up to it (not yet).

Or, we can optimize for lower cost. With our original full teams in the early weeks, we overstaffed and calculated a per-vaccine operating cost in the mid $20’s. Of course, the vaccine itself, is free to us and patients, paid for by the feds. But, tents, staff, project managers, coordinators with police, state, county and city government, vaccinators, training team, pharmacy team, coolers and vaccine supply chain management, traffic tents, snow removal, medical observation team, volunteer-coordinating managers, paramedics, command center coordinators, walkie-talkies, workstations on wheels, smartphone devices, wifi repeaters, cellular repeaters, scheduling of appointments, design of vaccine clinics… pretty soon it is a big operation. After a couple days, and constant re-design, we were able to trim operations down into the $17 range.

6: Optimize Health System Vaccination plan

First Covid Mass Vaccine design, last month, at Coors Field, Denver

Vaccinating patients on-site at University of Colorado Hospital, Bruce Schroeffel Auditorium

Outdoor vaccine guy vs Indoor vaccine guy

AND THEN. We compare our Mass Vaccine efforts to our ongoing (but less splashy) vaccine clinics in 10 facilities across UCHealth, spread across the entire state of Colorado, at even lower per-vaccine cost, with the capability of 5,000 to 10,000 per day. We are hiring permanent staff to run these vaccine clinics and stop borrowing from clinical teams across our system, as we think we will be doing this for quite some time.

Volunteers?

It is gratifying that we have lots of folks (many retired) willing to volunteer their time. The challenge with accepting this help is: it can be more expensive to run a scheduling calendar and training for hundreds (?thousands) of part-time (or one-time) volunteers than it is to have a reliable, skilled steady crew to take care of business. For the rare volunteer who COULD come regularly (for 8 or 10 hour shifts!) (for months!), that would be a blessing. And, as this vaccine saga goes on, we may indeed need more help.

Pop-up Outreach Clinics for the medically Under-served

Another effort I’m grateful for, are our Pop-Up vaccine clinics. We are taking our show on the road to multiple community centers and churches in medically under-served neighborhoods, where leaders are helping us schedule thousands of vaccination appointments among their neighbors. I’m heading to several in the coming weeks. (stand by for more posts from the front lines!)

UCHealth has given 270,000 vaccines, about 20% of Colorado’s total to date.

Yup, you read that right.

From this graph, you see our green Mass Vaccination events occurring on 2 weekends. Dark blue is University Hospital with over 13,000 vaccines given per week, and our other regions similarly. Light blue is South region, Purple is North region. Red includes our small hospital and outreach clinics at about 10,000 a week. Again, limited by supply.

7: Optimize National Vaccination

A rising tide lifts all boats.

For those interested, UCHealth has published a playbook for other organizations: https://www.uchealth.org/covid-19-mass-vaccination-planning/ with lots more details.

And Finally: a SNAFU Tent Vaccine Dance?

Is this real? Apparently, yes. Dr. Jonathan Pell and our elite crew of SNAFU tent staffers put together a dance invitation for upcoming cars.

I was surprised to find out how many younger colleagues had never heard of the term SNAFU.

The good news? Our process worked so well, the SNAFU team did not have much to do, a few cars here and there during the day. So much time, in fact, that they came up with their own DANCE.

I have no words.

CMIO’s take? How to get better in Seven Different Ways. Let’s go!

A Good Covid Vaccination Is Like Calligraphy

Join CT on the front line of vaccine clinic at UCHealth!

Hi y’all! I volunteered for a vaccine shift. Me and a couple dozen of my best friends. Here’s the scene: this clinic day was dedicated to second-vaccine doses for nearly 1000 healthcare colleagues, 12 vaccinator stations, and a constant stream of patients down the hallway. Our location can handle 2-3x this number, if we had vaccine supply to do so (and on last Friday, our location and 9 other UCHealth vaccine locations dispensed over 5000 vaccine doses across UCHealth).

Having been a grateful recipient of both my shots, I’m ready to wade in and do my part as well.

Ever wonder what it is like to be a vaccinator at a high-volume vaccine clinic?

On the Vaccine Front Line

First, you receive an email to take your training on EHR documentation requirements ahead of time, and a super quick anatomy refresher on deltoid muscle and intramuscular injections. Easily done, about 10 minutes. Then you report for duty at one of the twice daily 7-hour shifts. You get a quick in-person briefing, some quick hand-holding (ok sounds weird in pandemic times), and off we go!

Here’s my station. Because, as my daughter says, I’m totally into ‘hume-optimizing’ (determining the optimal way for humans to do things – sometimes to the great annoyance of family members or colleagues: sorry y’all) I thought hard and asked lots of questions of my more experienced medical assistants and nurses sitting nearby. Here’s what I learned:

  • Card colors: Green card: hold in air when ready for another patient; Yellow card: running out of any supplies; Red card: medical question (just embarrassing to hold this one up if you’re a physician)
  • Computer: login, find the immunization clinic, filter out discharged patients, sort by time of arrival, click to remove word-wrap to show more patients per screen.
  • The data entry fields pull forward 80% of relevant data to each new patient, as well as the vaccine name, lot#, and details, and I’m down to just confirming patient identity, confirming injection site (6- R deltoid, 7-L deltoid: even the physical mapping makes it easy: when patient facing you, the 6 key is on the same side as the patient’s R arm!), asking the 3 screening Q.
  • Then the shot itself! Vaccine syringe (obvious) but don’t stick yourself or the patient unintentionally. (HOT TIP) And when you insert the needle, do it with a quick pop so that breaking the skin and finishing the motion are in the same moment and the patient’s sensory nerves don’t get a chance to register more than one ‘oh’ of surprise. Specifically, don’t be slow.
  • (HOT TIP from a PA colleague in Interventional Radiology) hold the syringe between your thumb and 3rd and 4th digits, with your index positioned over the plunger. Really? That’s the way? (Sooooo much faster than my jab, then switch hands, try not to be awkward, plunge, untangle my hands and pull back) and the jab+plunge was now less than a second. Level up! (Gamer talk). After my “technique improvement” lots of patients were surprised: “Hey! Didn’t feel that at all!”
https://www.jacksonsart.com/blog/2017/03/28/maggie-cross-chinese-painting/
  • (Irrelevant aside) I notice that this new syringe grasp is reminiscent of the way you are to hold a Chinese Calligraphy brush, like you are cupping an egg and then grasping the brush. Ah, such elegance.
  • (HOT TIP From a brilliant nurse colleague) After the alcohol swab of the deltoid, pre-attach half of the bandaid and let it hang down. That way, you know where to put the shot and you don’t lose track (if no spot of blood) of where it went as you look away to dispose of the syringe. Then flip the bandaid fully on, VOILA! Totally changed my life.
  • Click the needle protector closed with one finger, toss in Sharps container.
  • Mumble sweet nothings to your anxious client while doing the next steps. Answer any questions.
  • Type ‘n’ in the time field to get the time Now. Click Accept to complete the vaccine charting. Their patient portal account is automatically updated, and the State Vaccine Registry is updated (I believe either real-time or at midnight every night)! Add 15 minutes to write onto a sticky note to attach to their vaccine card for them to know when they can leave if feeling okay.
  • Reach for a tiny sticker to put on the vaccine card with vaccine name, lot#, date, location.
  • Smile with your eyes, gesture to the seating area.
  • (HOT TIP from another RN colleague): Wipe down: with gloves on, pull an antiseptic wipe for the desk, chair, relevant surfaces. Whip off gloves, rip and prep an alcohol swab and bandaid —easier with gloves off. New pair of gloves, position a new syringe on desk, check if running low on supplies, raise the green card.
  • NEXT! Cycle time when all was humming, as little as 3 minutes. Less time than it took to read this.

Of course, GEEZ some patients had the temerity to ask questions. Or we would briefly run low on vaccine as the pharmacy team whipped up another batch in the next room, or someone had to run for sticky notes or wipes or gloves etc. Or maybe I NEEDED A POTTY BREAK, OK? Other times, we would have lulls in the action. Then it was up to our green-card-waving skills as to which of a half dozen vaccinators the lone patient would walk to.

Here’s a counterintuitive tip for non-medical workers.

You might think that having your vaccine done by a person in green scrubs or a white coat (in my case, both) would be ideal: they’re the doctors or providers. In our organization, nurses wear dark blue scrubs, medical assistants wear dark purple (violet?). Almost uniformly, the docs volunteering haven’t given vaccinations since … medical school. In my case, 30+ years ago. My recommendation: go with blue or violet scrubs for technical proficiency and years of practice. Of course, if you want a long medical conversation, by all means stop by my booth!

Here’s my tally. Actually 55 by end of day. I figured out that I could keep my needle caps on the desk until I had a break to make my hash marks and throw out the caps. The system worked. I know many of my RN and MA partners were quicker than me or had better patient-attracting green-card-waving skills or took shorter breaks. Not bad for my first half-day shift.

This was unlike my daily work.

As a physician in an internal medicine clinic I would worry about how to reduce the blood sugar of an overweight, depressed and anxious diabetes patient with high blood pressure, severe arthritis, needing wheelchair repairs, a dozen prescription refills and several prior-authorization meds, and now with several new worrisome symptoms and family pressures. As CMIO I would worry about how to balance the anger of providers spending long hours writing notes and orders versus allowing a sloppy, error-prone verbal-order paper-like system. And how to allocate time and effort between reducing physician burnout and improving predictive algorithms when those projects were sometimes in conflict.

Working in a vaccine clinic by contrast was like playing a fun, fast-paced, team-based video game (not that I would know): clear goals, mutual reinforcement, visible progress, strong team camaraderie, repetitive (and improving) physical skills, opportunities for rapid learning, immediate positive feedback and customer appreciation, excitement over doing a public good. We were IN THE ZONE.

Honestly, on good days, both regular clinic and informatics work is like this too.

What’s not to like?

Oh, here’s one of our physician leaders, Dr. Andy Meacham, even with everything he knows about how docs are the worst vaccinators, willing to be my victim. Thank you for your service, Dr. Meacham.

Gratitude

Honestly, it humbles me to part of such an amazing organization that assembled the people, the process, the tools so that I could drop in as part of a well-oiled machine, only a couple weeks into this brand new process. I’ve noted quite a few physician leader colleagues also taking part. So cool. 

“Covid-19, Yes, Your Days are Numbered! We’ll take back our streets and those jobs you’ve plundered!” — CT Lin & his terrible (My Shot – Covid) ukulele song

If all this talk gets you interested in the vaccine, See my recent blog post on how to get in line for a vaccine at UCHealth

CMIO’s take? Serving as a Covid Vaccine vaccinator was one of the most gratifying things I’ve done. I’m signing up for more shifts. See you soon!

I am NOT throwing away my Shot (I got mine today!)

Covid-19 Vaccine! I got mine! And University of Colorado Hospital is set up to give over 1000 doses per day just at our hospital.

As you know, Covid-19 vaccine is out in the wild. Colorado received the first shipment earlier this week, and we at UCHealth received the first 17,000 doses. We set up an infrastructure to schedule vaccinations through My Health Connection, our patient portal. We sent out over 10,000 invitations this week, and already 5000 health care workers have already booked their appointment. IN 48 HOURS! Never have I ever heard of something moving this fast. 97% of physicians/providers state their willingness and intent to be vaccinated.

Among my colleagues, many of us were hitting “refresh” waiting for our invite to schedule the vaccine. Last night, I was super excited receive my invite. Woo! So organized the portal ensures you book both appointments at the same time. Super simple!

Then, super easy on arrival; we use our patient portal to e-check in, verify my demographics, read the consent form for the vaccine, so that my check in can be super simple and super quick. Yes!

And here we are! 8 check-in stations humming smoothly. Everyone masked up, smiling, everyone so excited to be part of DOING SOMETHING to fight back against the pandemic. Bam!

Here we are in our auditorium. Sixteen vaccination stations, with appointments every 10 minutes, and vaccine service hours from 5am through 9pm. I calculate our capacity to vaccinate about 1000 people a day. This just at UCH; we have 9 other vaccine locations throughout UCHealth’s hospitals in Steamboat, Fort Collins, Colorado Springs, Pikes Peak, also actively vaccinating. Our goal: to administer our entire received batch before Christmas day. Zowie!

I got mine! 15 minutes socially distanced in the auditorium to observe for immediate reaction, and then done! In and out in about 30 minutes! Woo!

As you know, the FDA and CDC guidance is: Healthcare workers and long term care residents and staff first (winter), then high risk general public (spring) and then general public (summer). We are getting started, and have infrastructure now to deliver shots just a quickly as possible. We anticipate vaccinating up to 20% of all people of the State of Colorado. Hope to see you here soon!

CMIO’s take? I am NOT throwin’ away MY SHOT! (could it be there is a new ukulele song/rap? … stay tuned!)

Forest bathing: what is it good for?

Sometimes it is good to get away. Mind you, this photo is more than a year old (before pandemic), but it makes a few points…

Exercise

Remember to get some exercise. Just … not with 3 super-fit members of your family. Notice everyone having a good time running, except Dad with the barely suppressed grimace of pain and facial mask of determination.

Family

Remember, family members are supposed to support each other. And not run too fast for old people to keep up.

Forest

This is the beautiful Forest of Nisene Marks. I have to say, those articles about Forest Bathing? Yup, they’re right on. That time spent in the woods? When I wasn’t gasping for air, it was a spectacular place, a place to recharge.

Leisurely Jog

As always, I had agreed to go for a “leisurely jog” with the kids and with my baby sis. We would run up the path for maybe a mile or 2, then “It’ll be easy, coming back down! Come on! It’ll be fun!”

Grasping my iPhone with a death grip, I set off. Because, if you’re going to go for a run, your iPhone HAS to track your exercise, doesn’t it? As quippy daughter always says:

“Dad, it’s NOT about the steps. IT’S ABOUT THE LIFE.”

I disagree. If my exercise app doesn’t track it, what’s the point?

Nevertheless, we get to the top (barely). I sprint to the turnaround sign (because, Dads have to make a point). This causes nausea with imminent vagal response.

After some time spent with arms tripod-ed on the knees, gasping for air, concerned looks from the sister (the kids are immune to these cries for sympathy) and an extended period of hands-on-hips walking back down the trail, we commence our downward leg.

I was promised an easier time headed down. This was a complete fabrication.

It was several hours later (or so it seemed) we got back to the car.

CMIO’s take: I do have to admit, the smells, the sights, the laughter were a wonderful respite. Yes, we did bathe in the forest (with our clothes on). And it did refresh my spirit. How do YOU recharge?

Fatal crashes, the Macintosh, and the Shallows

https://www.wired.com/story/how-dumb-design-wwii-plane-led-macintosh

Thanks to WIRED for this article on the design of planes, specifically the B-17 bomber in World War II and how fatal crashes led to better design and human/machine and human/computer interfaces, leading to the Macintosh.

Although thought provoking, I dislike and disagree with some of the discussions in this article:

  • Carnival Cruise’s idea that a “personal genome” should learn your preferences as you wander the ship, and show and encourage you to see more of the same. Where is serendipity, discovery, and being exposed to contrasting ideas?
  • Furthermore, what about The Shallows: what the internet is doing to our brains? Like what I’m doing to you here, reading my blog post, probably sent here from a link from your Twitter or Linkedin or Facebook streams. We are skimmers, not readers anymore. Can we even hold a complex thread of ideas in our head on one topic?
  • I’m reminded of the medical term “clang association” where patients with psychosis hear something which reminds them of an unrelated conversation. Distractable, are we.
  • Also, the pre-flight checklist, I think, comes from the B-17 bomber, the plane that was claimed to be “too complicated for humans to fly”.

CMIO’s take? See how I illustrated clang associations for you? AFAIK I don’t have psychosis or schizophrenia, but then maybe — SQUIRREL!

What clinical informatics is NOT. Also Nerd Glasses and Propeller Hats.

My offspring. An out-take from Go-Go, their K-pop dance routine. See hyperlink below.

I’m reading a book called Mindfulness in Plain English: another book my daughter left laying around the house with her annotations in it. I love the underlining and ‘YES!’ marks and also the ‘is it though? You shouldn’t wait to be perfect…’ comments. Just a few short years ago, she was in the playpen, and now I love to see her mind at work.

Anyhow, mindfulness meditation is something that I aspire to: I have had months where I meditate daily, and there are times when I forget and lose the habit. I have found it calming and centering and have found clarity through the practice.

You can refer to my blog series ‘CT Meditates, a comedy’ from 2017.

What I love about this current book is the chapter on what Meditation is Not. I love it. It helps define the thing by talking about what it is NOT. For example an annotated list:

WHAT MEDITATION IS NOT

  • Misconception 1: meditation is just relaxation
  • Misconception 2: meditation means going into a trance
  • Misconception 3: meditation is mysterious and cannot be understood
  • Misconception 4: meditation is for saints. Not regular people.
  • Misconception 5: meditation is running away from reality

I love this idea. Writing about the negative space helps clarify what something IS. So, here goes.

There are lots of misconceptions about what Clinical Informatics is.

It can be defined as the science and practice of managing information by capturing, storing, analyzing, retrieving, and using data to improve the care of patients and populations.

Sure, whatever. Perhaps it is more meaningful to talk about misconceptions.

WHAT CLINICAL INFORMATICS IS NOT

  • Misconception: informatics people are the secret Star Chamber of the Electronic Health Record. They wear propeller hats or nerd glasses. <– Yes, these are my nerd kids wearing propeller hats and nerd glasses. And yes, I am proud of them.
  • Misconception: informatics helps you set up your computer. (That’s Information Technology)
  • Misconception: informatics has to do with servers, network cables, wifi problems. (still, IT)
  • Misconception: informatics is a way to force people to do things they don’t want to do. (no, no, no)
  • Misconception: informatics is only about designing things, we leave training to others. (ok, partly right, but we all fail if we don’t train adequately)
  • Misconception: informatics is for people who prefer computers and don’t like talking with humans. (no. please do not send us “the doctor who is our resident computer nerd.”)
  • Misconception: informatics is quick and easy, just put a hard stop there, and DONE! (no. we do not “force those other doctors to do this thing because it makes it more convenient for me and my project” UNLESS it is also good for patient care and clinical leaders all agree)
  • Misconception: informatics has no need of customer/user (patient or clinician) feedback. (just no)
  • Misconception: informatics is a special and arcane field that only computer geeks will understand. (sigh. we fail if this happens)
  • Misconception: informatics is a field of medicine where most people tell you, NO we can’t do that.
  • Misconception: informatics always takes months to achieve the goal or complete a project. (when we do Sprints, we can amaze our docs)
  • Misconception: informatics is unnecessary: an EHR project only needs a subject matter expert and a computer analyst (sorry, without an informaticist to translate, such a project is likely to fail)

Informatics is NOT “Hard stop, and Done!” Instead it is building relationships, understanding the pressures and desires of patients, providers, staff, and understanding the ultimate goal of health care.

Indeed, it is perhaps, one of the major advances of modern healthcare. I would argue, the field of “clinical informatics” should eventually become standard curriculum for ALL physicians.

CMIO’s take: Health care is about using our best science, our best work-flow, our best teamwork. We use this information to heal individual patients and improve the health of our communities. We need great, up-to-date information to do that. Only by capturing, storing, analyzing data, creating new knowledge, and delivering that seamlessly to the provider at the bedside (or directly to the patient) can we grow, improve and evolve as a learning health system.

The Quandary 14’er. Observations of an aging human.

Coming out of the tree-line, noticing the bright moonlight, we shut off our headlamps, casting the trail in an eerie black-and-white moonscape. We hiked by moonlight!

Quandary Peak, left, dominating the Breckenridge valley.

Quandary, for many Coloradoans, is just another one of those 53 peaks in Colorado over 14,000 feet in elevation. For me, however, it was a daunting collection of challenges posed by my college-aged kids. Would I get up at 2:45am to attempt to summit at sunrise? Would I know how to hike in darkness with a headlamp and not trip and fall? Would I keep the pace? Would I tumble off the wind-blown trail on the way up?

Quandary Peak is apparently one of the easier Colorado 14’ers to hike; only 3 miles from the trailhead to summit. How hard could it be?

Yup. Pretty hard.

Those of you who have followed The Undiscovered Country know that I will try anything … once. For example, a 7 mile cross-country ski-in trip to Uncle Bud’s Hut.

Some quick observations:

  • At 2:45am, not a lot of cars on the road to the Quandary trailhead, up near Breckenridge, about 2 hours from Denver.
  • Hiking in the middle of the night, with disappearing trails, steep rocky steps and tree roots galore, is … trippy? exhilarating? disorienting? All of the above.
  • Hiking with a headlamp is surprisingly do-able (especially with the adrenaline of: am-I-going-to-survive-this energy).
  • Hiking with a headlamp is also highly claustrophobic, in that your entire world is the stomp of your boot, the clatter of your hiking poles, the next visible tree, the next rock, the next chance to trip in your faint circle of light.
  • About 4am, coming out of the tree-line, noticing the bright moonlight, we shut off our headlamps, casting the trail in an eerie black-and-white moonscape. We hiked by moonlight! This distracted me from the gusting, bone-chilling winds and the constant scramble over the rock fields. Nope, don’t have a camera that can capture this. But, next best thing (below):
Stars, the son, and the hint of sunrise.
Pre-dawn scramble. Before the madding crowds.
Pre-dawn gloam in solitude, then blazing sun on descent, increasingly crowded.

About 530am, a purple, then green, then orange glimmer of sunrise to the east. Interestingly, the rocks started to glow orange UNDERNEATH, while faintly white on top. Is this what sunrise hiking is like? Never, have I ever…

Imagine: much darker, and somehow, the rocks glow orange underneath…

About 630am, after some shifting clouds, orange crepuscular rays burst through and the entire rocky ascent turned brilliant orange, moonlight banished. 4 liters of water disappears fast on a constant upward climb at 11,000 then 12,000 then 13,000 feet. So do snack bars and ham and cheese sandwiches.

Summit! about 7am. How could 3 miles take 4 hours? In hindsight: donning and doffing gear. Frequent gasping-for-air breaks (disguised as water breaks). I have no idea how Everest climbers have base camp far above 14,000 feet. Even acclimated to 5000 ft altitude in Denver, the additional elevation is tough on the lungs, heart, brain.

The US Geological Survey marker, 14,200 ft. Quandary Peak.

The timing of our climb, on a Saturday morning starting around 3am, was good; few people on the trail, and at our summit, we were among the first 10 people there, taking pictures. The descent, however… Well, lets just say, the photo below was about 8am. Within the hour, we saw hundreds of other peak-aspiring hikers on the narrow trail.

Rocks, and a cool ridgeline hike.

I’m thankful of active offspring who invite me along on such adventures. I’ve summitted 3 peaks that were 14’ers: Gray’s and Torrey’s, and now Quandary. Today I vow that this is my last 14’er: no need to punish this body any further.

On the other hand, I said the same after Gray’s and Torrey’s, two peaks side-by-side and commonly done on the same hike. I made the mistake that day of not bringing hiking poles. The descent, not the uphill, was my undoing: near the end of the hike, my right knee was so swollen and painful that I ended up keeping the knee straight and just swinging it outwards to take a step forward. In our family, we call that the “Pinocchio leg” for somewhat unclear reasons.

Quandary summit with daughter. The Rockies go on forever, it appears.

My main goal this trip: 1. Survive. 2. Use hiking poles to aid descent and avoid Pinocchio leg. 3. Blog about it. Success!

CMIO’s take? What are you doing to recharge?

Ghost Kitchens and their meaning

image from the NYTimes article

https://www.newyorker.com/news/letter-from-silicon-valley/our-ghost-kitchen-future

This is a great thinking piece from the New York Times. A ghost kitchen is a trailer set up in a parking lot, with chefs cooking dishes from restaurants, sometimes from 3-4 different restaurants. This can result in serving meals in the parking lot, or setting up for local delivery AS IF delivered from the main restaurant. This solves the problem of underemployed chefs at restaurants with inadequate social distancing seating, or restaurants that have had to remain closed for some reason.

Observations:

  • Placing ghost kitchens in parking lots leverages old spaces
  • Ghost kitchens emphasize hyperlocal location
  • Ghost kitchens are thriving during the pandemic
  • Ghost kitchens leverage internet tools: apps, A/B testing, analytics, and allows nimble innovation, recombination, creativity, disruption

Read the article, and come back here to think with me. What could healthcare learn from Ghost Kitchens? We are already seeing the beginning of disruption in healthcare: the use of telehealth visits with patients has increased the flexibility of patients and providers by removing geography as a constraint (in some cases). What could A/B testing, or analytics do to further serve our patients in a high-quality, personalized, lower cost way?

CMIO’s take? Sometimes, you have to look outside your usual work-sphere to get the best ideas. Sometimes you have to be willing to disrupt yourself before someone else gets there first.

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