Navigating Open Notes and the Information Blocking Rule: an AMA innovation panel discussion

AMA Physician Innovation Network Avatar
from the AMA-Assn.org website

https://innovationmatch.ama-assn.org/groups/ama-physician-innovation-network-public-area/discussions/navigating-open-notes-and-the-information-blocking-rule

There are a whole bunch of Open Notes experts (and also me!) on a panel this week (ends tomorrow!) discussing Open Notes experience in regards to the Information Blocking federal rule. Come join us! Ask challenging questions! See what others have done! Lots of discussion on the pros and cons, the pitfalls and the successes.

“The unattainable best is the enemy of all the available betters” @Bill Burnett

You have more than one life in you. Lets ideate THREE 5-year visions. Do this exercise to generate creative possibilities. — Bill Burnett

In my clinical practice this week, I met a patient with whom I discussed this idea: he was a senior administrator in an academic institution, highly accomplished, well respected, and yet quite miserable at work and at home, feeling trapped.

It made me think back to Design Thinking principles, and creative approaches to hard problems.

Having been to the Design Thinking for Social Systems short course at Stanford, I’ve been working to apply this thinking at work and at home. I posted last year on my enthusiasm for design thinking as a process and approach to creativity and innovation. I came across Bill Burnett’s online video which prompted me to dive back into the material again.

A couple of books to recommend.

Designing your life by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans. More about applying design thinking principles to your life.

Bill also gives an overview in his great Stanford TEDx talk.

Creative Confidence by David and Tom Kelly. A history and principles of design thinking by some of the originators

Designing for Growth by Jeanne Liedtka and Tim Ogilvie. A practical book for application of design thinking. See also the Field Guide.

It made me think of myself, my work, my home, and how “designing your life” might be an exercise we could all apply with immense benefit. Join me?

CMIO’s take: What are you waiting for?

Big data graphics: NYTimes – Every Building in America (and Ed Tufte)

In informatics, we often are faced with big data sets and how to make this data comprehensible. Here is an example from cartography. Beautiful graphics, highly usable. We can aspire this “data density” in our own graphics.

My favorite book crafting great information graphics from data, is of course Edward Tufte’s Visual Display of Quantitative Information. He talks about data density, sparklines, lots of cool stuff. AND he has an online course. I have been his disciple for years, and have ALL his books.

The only thing better than gathering and making sense of big data, is being able to explain it clearly to change minds and behavior.

My Failure Resumé (a talk)

What lessons can we learn from CT Lin’s failures?

Thanks to the Colorado Chapter of HIMSS (Health Information Management Systems Society) and to Bonnie Roberts and Rich Morris for co-hosting my presentation.

Based on my recent Failure Resumé 1 pager. Here are some personal stories, life lessons, and 3 exercises to help you build a failure-tolerant future.

With, of course, a bonus ukulele song at the end.

CMIO’s take: Have you written a failure resumé? Are you building a failure tolerant future? Let me know in the comments.